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Nastia Eliseeva / Nuppu
  

 


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Your window on Finnish Environmental Art / Ympäristötaide verkossa / Editor: Lea Turto

Nastia Eliseeva, Nuppu-ryhmä / Nuppu Group
Nastia Eliseeva: The Windsocks, made of nylon, metal stings and tubes. Laru 08 Environmental Art Exhibition in Helsinki 2008

Anastasia Eliseeva

english Environmental artist
a member of the Finish environmental art groups "LARU ART“" and "NUPPU".

Born:  19.3.1981 in St Petersburg, Russland
lives and works in Berlin
Phone: +491577 683 58 92
Email: nastia.eliseeva(at)gmail.com
CV: Curriculum Vitae

Nastia Eliseeva, born 19.3.1981 in St. Petersburg, enjoyed the classical Russian art education. In 2005 she finished with a degree in ceramics at the St. Petersburg State Academy of Art and Design. Her diploma: a series of abstract ceramic vessels on her „Journey to Armenia“. In addition, in 2002, she studied for six month at the Danish art school „Bornholms Højskole“.

Since 2004 she has worked with German, Finish, Italian and other international artists. Her objects and installations were shown in numerous art projects and exhibitions, amongst others in Galleries and Museums in St. Petersburg, Helsinki, Stuttgart, Büdelsdorf or Valencia.

Since 2006 she has worked as a visual arts teacher for children and adults. She ist he mother of two little kids and lives and works since 2008 in Berlin.

Artist's Statement:
Environment - the rural and the urban are very different, but sometimes also similar. They both have their particular rhythm, a characteristic but varied pulse. This pulse -  sometimes loud, often quiet, the greater and smaller parts of it - they are always in dialog - and it fascinates me. My works are the knots which mark some points of this pulse. In them I try to catch what this pulse is.


"Have it!  (Take one!)" 2007, Laru 07 Environmental Art Exhibition in Helsinki
The work contains objects that remind us of seeds, insect eggs, candies, stones or anything else. You want to take one with you? -- Have it!

Nastia Eliseeva: Have it
Nastia Eliseeva: Have it! , Laru 07, Helsinki, Finland, made of concrete and painted

"We don’t really need everything we want to own. We feel a drive for something just nice and quite useless. It is a feeling we cannot control. We look at things in shops, in commercials and we want them without thinking.

Nastia Eliseeva: Have it! , Laru 07, Helsinki
Nastia Eliseeva: Have it! , Laru 07, Helsinki, Finland,  made of concrete and painted
 
It goes similarly when we are in nature. Some likeable little stones, pieces of wood or shells. We want them because they are nice even we don’t really need them.

Natastia Eliseeva: Have It, Laru, Helsinki 2007
Natastia Eliseeva: Have It, Laru, Helsinki 2007, Finland, made of concrete and painted

Do we really need to posses or would it maybe enough just to perceive, observe and see to make things “ours”?"
- tells Nastia Eliseeva

 

"Invisible" 1(duck feet) 2008, Kivinokka, Helsinki

"This work shows the presence of something and at the same time its absence. It shows how fragile, temporary and changing nature is. You see an object of unique color, perfectly shaped by the nature: duck feet.

Nastia Eliseeva: (in)visible, Laru, Helsinki
Natastia Eliseeva: Invisible 1 (duck feet), Made of porcelain and glazes. Kivinokka 2008, Environmental Art Exhibition in Helsinki, Finland

Where are the ducks? Are they in another reality? Or are they there, just not visible?  The feet are an image of the bird - visible and invisible at the same time, mystical, as nature itself."
- tells Nastia Eliseeva

 

"Coat hooks", invisible 3, Laru 09 Environmental Art Exhibition in Helsinki 2009
 
"I see coat hooks as a sign telling about the private story of people. There is a song from a Russian poet about a raincoat’s hook and its meaning: Even when there is no coat on it any more, the hook is a symbol of something very important, of something that’s missing.

Nastia Eliseeva: coat hooks, Laru 09, Helsinki
Nastia Eliseeva: coat hooks, Laru 09, Helsinki

The hooks tell us about the past and the future: about a cozy moment of being together on the one side and long journeys on the other.

An empty coat hook is a symbol of an absence and of the possible presence of someone at the same time: here he was, but now he is somewhere else.

Nastia Eliseeva: coat hooks, Laru 09, Helsinki
Nastia Eliseeva: coat hooks, Laru 09, Helsinki

My hooks are all different, made of different metals, designed in different style - as different as their (former) owners."
- tells Nastia Eliseeva

 

The Windsocks, Laru 08, Environmental Art Exhibition in Helsini 2008

"Windsocks originated in China and Japan, where they were considered a symbol of good luck and longevity.
It is a romantic symbol of a new way and a long road. Windsocks are chiefly used at airports to indicate wind direction for takeoffs and landings.

Nastia Eliseeva: The Windsocks, Laru 08, Environmental Art Exhibition, Helsini
Nastia Eliseeva: The Windsocks, made of nylon, metal stings and tubes. Laru 08, Environmental Art Exhibition, Helsini

The windsock shows the force and direction of the wind. My windsocks will also allow one to see the power and shape of air, which changes all the time. The Wind is responsible for making the sculpture."
- tells Nastia Eliseeva

 

"Limitless", Laru 10, Environmental Art Exhibition in Helsinki 2010
"My room in the forest.

Nastia Eliseeva: Limitless, Laru 10, Environmental Art Exhibition, Helsinki
Nastia Eliseeva: Limitless, Laru 10, Environmental Art Exhibition, Helsinki, Finland. Photo by Kirsi aMacKenzie

In the Soviet Union it was popular to put so called „photo wall paper“ in your living room: a huge wall paper picture depicting a forest. People wanted to make their livig room limitless, bring a romantic picture of nature to their home. I make it the other way round and transplant the image of a living room to the real forest. Maybe I want to bring the cosyness and feeling of security of your home to the inhospitable nature. At the same time it’s a non-room, as the definition of a room is that it is a space limited by (four) walls. My room in the forest is permeable and just a hint.

For my work i will put wallpaper on trees. It will be fixed with glue (flour paste), but not to the trees themselves. On the bottom my forest room will be equipped with a wall base (made of silicon). The work is absolutly harmles for the nature and easy to remove.
 - tells Nastia Eliseeva